Gadgets

Published on February 17th, 2016 | by Amber Healy

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A Party in a Pill

Allegedly, this is real. Allegedly.

The story goes like this: A Czech artist by the name of Jan Poope (really) has developed this pill. It’s a large capsule that lights on up either end when activated by a magnet. You swallow the pill and, within a few minutes, your body begins to feel electric pulses akin to the heavy bass felt at a rave. Before you swallow it, you can pick the tempo: 95 beats per minute (BPM), 130 BPM or 143 BPM.

On his Indiegogo page, Poope compares the sensation to “standing in the middle of a concert hall with a powerful audio system.” There’s some initial unpleasantness, however:

“After swallowing, it takes the Audiopill about an hour to make it through the upper parts of gastrointestinal tract (in the first minutes you have to press your palm on your chest to feel the beats). But after it descends to the pelvic area, the effects become very intensive. You may for a while regret your experimental courage.”

The internal intestinal earthquake also may provide a “unique feeling of restlessness, amazement and elation,” but, as a side benefit, might “serve as a teaching aid for your own medical or even maniacal introspection.” So, you see, it’s not just a rave in a pill, it’s a learning device for emotional and psychological growth! Or something. And by the way? The sensation reportedly lasts for 10 hours. Nonstop.

The capsule comes in two colours: “Clear empty space (unisex transparent)” or “Juicy juicy juicy pink (for girls),” and carries a warning urging users to…well… make sure the pill fully completes its journey through the gastrointestinal tract safely, roughly 48 hours after ingestion. Sounds like fun, right?

Poope (or Jan Strmiska, his legal name, thankfully) only raised €148 of its €150,000 goal in the month-long campaign, so it’s unclear whether the product could still be ordered and taken for a spin. But the Indiegogo page is still up: learn more by reading here.

 

 

 

 




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About the Author

I write about music policy and lawsuits because they're endlessly fascinating.


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