Medical Mysteries of Music

Published on August 30th, 2018 | by Alan Cross

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Music therapy is a thing because it works. Here’s how it can help you or a loved one.

For reasons unknown to evolutionary biologists, our brains seem to be hardwired for music. Did these parts of our brains evolve as an offshoot of developing language? Were our ancestors inspired by birdsong? Could this be a by-product of religious ritual? No one knows. Yet here we are.

A good thing, too, because music can be used as an effective medicine for a variety of things. Will Tottle, writing for My Audio Sound, has this in-depth look at the field of music therapy. I hope you find it helpful.

Music has been with us for thousands of years as a form of entertainment, communication, celebration, and mourning. There are so many different emotions that music can help us to express, and it is a language that we share universally, as well as one that everyone can understand.

The style of music that we listen to most and enjoy may change every decade, but that sense of communication and feeling always remains. If you, or someone close to you, suffer from mental health conditions, you may find that they listen to music quite a lot, or even play it.

Music has a way of helping us express emotions that we don’t even understand ourselves, and can put these feelings into meaningful lyrics, or just a tune that resonates with every fibre of our being.

For many, music is a lifeline that keeps them tethered to the world, and without it, so many of us would be lost entirely. It is because of this link that music therapy was developed, and it is a great way to learn how to channel your feelings and combat mental illness. As someone who suffers from crippling anxiety and waves of depression, I have always been interested in trying this form of therapy out.

Whether you like to play the music or listen to it, you might be surprised to discover how beneficial this form of treatment can be, and in this extensive article, we look at the different ways in which music therapy can boost mental health.

Keep reading. This is important.




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About the Author

is an internationally known broadcaster, interviewer, writer, consultant, blogger and speaker. In his 30+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters. He’s also known as a musicologist and documentarian through programs like The Ongoing History of New Music.


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